Reflections from our school leaders

Blog post by Adele, Gabe, and Lucy, 8th grade

 

Being an 8th grader at Bishop Marshall is a lot to think about. It is definitely a bittersweet experience. You are happy to be the leaders of the school, but you know in the end you will have to graduate.

Being the oldest in the school carries a lot of responsibility. The little kids look up to what you are doing, in hopes to be an 8th grader at Bishop Marshall. You are expected to organize fundraisers, and provide a good example for the younger kids. When you go out for field trips, or community service, you have to represent your school in a positive way.

Academically, being an 8th grader is hard. You are expected to work your hardest, while the teachers work their hardest to prepare you for high school. You are always being challenged, and always able to work at your own learning level. Everyone learns things at different paces, and Bishop Marshall embraces that. This is incredibly important as an 8th grader because you need to retain a lot of information before you graduate. Other activities such as physical education are taken seriously. You learn new strategies in a variety of sports. Art and music are also important, and give you important skills to use later on in your life. Everything here as an 8th grader is important.

I am excited to be an 8th grader, no matter the obstacles. The teachers and students are supportive and caring, and are always nice. Being an 8th grader at Bishop Marshall is a wonderful learning experience.                                 -by Adele Bernier

 

What it feels like to be an 8th grader. I have waited so long for this moment, I felt like this time would never happen.  So far it has been a fun time. Being an 8th grader is a lot different. You have so much more responsibility, but you are also expected a lot from. All of the other teachers from Kindergarten to 7th grade have prepared me for this year and all of that hard work has paid off. This year has been so great I  do not want to move on to high school. Although this is my last year here at Bishop Marshall, I will always be part of Bishop Marshall.

What are we doing this year? This year we are hosting the BJAMS Pep Rally, which we will take on from all of the 8th graders before us. We will also be going on a Boston trip in May which has been an annual thing for the longest time. Being an 8th grader you are a role model for all of the other kids in the school, which is a big responsibility. Overall being an 8th grader is fun and enjoyable.                                  -by Gabe Wright

 

This is my ninth year here at Bishop Marshall. I remember walking into Kindergarten and seeing Mrs. Piper and she was so welcoming to me. I was so nervous to spend all day at this school, but little did I know that I would be at that school for the next 8 years. When I was little, I always wanted to be like the 8th graders. I remember when we had Mass and assembly buddies, and they were always so nice and tall. As I got older and realized how close I was to being an 8th grader, I became aware that I would be leaving the only school and teachers I have ever known. There are a lot more responsibilities as you get older, but for the most part they are not as bad if you do them with your best friends.

Bishop Marshall has given me so many opportunities that I would never have imagined doing. One opportunity Bishop Marshall gave me was playing Co-Ed soccer. I am one of the only girls playing all boys teams. I was really nervous in the beginning, but it is now one of my favorite things. Another opportunity is that I get to see what the Catholic faith is like. My family is not Catholic, but going to Mass and having religion class show me what it would be like if I was Catholic.

I love it here and am not ready to leave, but I know that by the end of the year I will be prepared for high school and I will take everything that Bishop Marshall has taught me and will forever remember some of the best 9 years of my life and my friendships that will last a lifetime.

-by Lucy Genung